• Laser ranging to the moon
    Laser Ranging to the Moon
    NGSLR, located at NASA GSFC's Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical
    Observatory (GGAO),is shown ranging to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)
    orbiting the Moon. The LRO Laser Ranging (LR) system enables the spacecraft
    to achieve its precision orbit determination requirement.
  • antenna
    GGAO VGOS
    VGOS, located at NASA GSFC's Goddard
    Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory
    (GGAO), is the next generation of
    geodetic VLBI systems currently
    under development.
  • Monument brace
    Drilled Brace Monument for GNSS Antenna
    The newly installed drilled brace monument for the
    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antenna at
    NASA GSFC's Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical
    Observatory (GGAO). The multi-GNSS-capable
    receiver will track signals from several GNSS including
    GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo.
  • DORIS
    DORIS Antenna
    The Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated
    by Satellite (DORIS) antenna located at NASA GSFC's Goddard
    Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) tracks
    satellites equipped with DORIS beacons; NGSLR can be seen
    in the background.

Latest Project news

MIT Haystack hosts the NEROC Fifth Annual Radio Science Symposium
11/19/2020
MIT Haystack Observatory logoMIT Haystack hosted the NEROC Fifth Annual Radio Science Symposium (https://www.haystack.mit.edu/neroc2020) in fireside chat plus virtual poster format. The Northeast Radio Observatory Corporation, NEROC, is a nonprofit consortium of educational and research institutions founded in 1967 to run the Haystack 37-m radio telescope and operate Haystack Observatory; current membership comprises 12 academic institutions including MIT, Boston, Brandeis, Dartmouth, and Harvard University.

Precise Orbit Determination is a critical part of measureing sea level rise
11/15/2020
cimage of asatellite pointing at the groundPrecise Orbit Determination (POD) is a geodetic technique that enables knowing the exact position of a satellite above a stable reference point on Earth. Determining the exact position of the satellite when an observation is acquired is crucial in measuring sea level height. As noted by Dr. Frank Lemoine, a geodesist with NASA's Space Geodesy Project and a member of NASA's Ocean Surface Topography science team, "If you don’t do POD right, you're not going to get any sea level results."

Read the full article on nasa.gov...

Publication of the 2016-2019 ILRS Report
11/03/2020
cover of the 29=016-2019 ILRS reportThe ILRS is pleased to announce the publication of the 2016-2019 ILRS Report, the seventh published volume for the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). This publication once again concentrates on achievements and work in progress. This 2016-2019 ILRS Technical Report is available through the ILRS website at URL:

https://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov/about/reports/annualrpts/ilrsreport_2016.html.

The ILRS would like to thank all contributors to this latest issue.

ILRS Virtual World Tour 2020 third circular
10/13/2020
ILRS logoRegistration for the virtual tours is now open. Attendance for each session will be limited to 250 connections and will be available on a first come, first served basis. We encourage group attendance where possible; only one person is required to register for the group. Interested parties can register at:

https://cddis.nasa.gov/ILRS_Virtual_World_Tour_2020/Registration/

Attendees are required to register for each session they plan to attend. There is no fee for registering and attending any of the tours. Registration will be closed on October 26, 2020.

ILRS Virtual World Tour 2020 second circular
09/25/2020
ILRS logoIn place of the planned Workshop this November, the ILRS wanted to take the opportunity to try something different and look in detail at a selection of stations in the global network. The online 'Virtual World Tour', to be held November 2-6, 2020, will visit 5 stations in 5 days, stopping at:

  • Graz, Austria
  • Greenbelt MD, USA
  • Simosato, Japan
  • Yarragadee, Australia
  • Zimmerwald, Switzerland

Each two-hour session will consist of an introductory presentation about the station followed by a tour of the site highlighting instrumentation, software, safety, automation, operations, as well as current issues and future plans. These tours will include a mixture of pre-recorded and live presentations with an opportunity for questions.

More information about the workshop can be found on the website:

https://cddis.nasa.gov/ILRS_Virtual_World_Tour_2020/index.html

and in the second circular.

ILRS Virtual World Tour 2020
09/02/2020
ILRS logoIn place of an ILRS Workshop this November, the ILRS wanted to take the opportunity to try something different and look in detail at a selection of stations in the global network. Therefore, the ILRS is planning an online 'Virtual World Tour', to be held November 2-6, 2020, to virtually visit 5 stations around the world in 5 days. To learn more about the event please visit the workshop website: https://cddis.nasa.gov/ILRS_Virtual_World_Tour_2020/index.html.



Read all news



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